Bourbon Maple Pork Chops with Apples

I don’t mean to brag but this is the first time in nine-ish years Daylight Savings time hasn’t royally screwed my family’s sleep schedule over for days (weeks?) at a time. My sister-in-law mentioned she was getting up at 4:30am with her 1-year-old and a wave of deja vu flooded my system as I immediately felt like I needed a giant cup of coffee and maybe a nap as she was talking.

But then the realization hit that my kids were sleeping like normal human beings. Granted a couple of them have a cold right now so that might have something to do with it, but I’m not asking questions. I’m just over here in my warm cozy bed, feeling slightly smug and supremely grateful to not be awake with toddlers/babies at 4:30am anymore.

Jackson literally crouched on the floor next to my bed this morning and yelled ‘Boo’ to wake me up. Thankfully his father was right behind him with a cup of coffee to hand me as I sat straight up out of a dead sleep. That coffee probably saved his life in the moment but I’ve been chuckling about it all morning. Big kids are so funny and weird and wonderful.

Enough about sleep, let’s talk about pork chops shall we? My only experience with pork chops were the chewy and tough ones my mother made as a kid, cooked in cream of mushroom soup. Chops can be hard, especially boneless ones because they cook quickly and don’t have a ton of fat to help with moisture.

Because we buy a whole pig each year and have it butchered locally, I have cuts of meat that I wouldn’t necessarily buy at the grocery store. It’s a good exercise though and while I’ve clearly had many failures, when I have a win, I feel like I need to share it because maybe you need a new recipe too.

My pork chops were quite thick, so I cut them in half length-wise so they were about an inch thick. I made a marinade of bourbon (you could also use a light beer or chicken stock if you don’t want to cook with alcohol) soy sauce, ginger,maple syrup and Worcestershire sauce. The marinade made the chops super flavorful and tender and the apples and onions sautéed in all that pork goodness gave the dish a subtle sweet and rich finish without being heavy. I roasted some sweet potatoes and cauliflower and called it dinner. Aaron LOVED this dinner, the kids gave mixed reviews but that probably had more to do with the cauliflower than the meat.

Bourbon Maple Pork Chops with Apples and Onions

  • 4-6 boneless pork chops trimmed to 1-inch thickness
  • 3 tablespoons bourbon
  • 1/4 cup soy sauce
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1/4 cup maple syrup
  • 2 teaspoons grated ginger (about a 1-inch piece of fresh ginger)
  • 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 medium yellow onion, thinly sliced
  • 2 medium or 1 large Fuji apple, thinly sliced

In a bowl, whisk together the bourbon (or beer or chicken stock), olive oil, maple syrup, ginger, soy and Worcestershire sauce. Salt and pepper pork chops, then submerge them in marinade. Cover with plastic wrap and leave on the counter for up two hours or in the refrigerator for 4 to 8 hours.

In a large sauté pan, heat a drizzle of olive oil over medium-low heat. Cook pork chops for about 3 minutes on each side so they have crisp edges and are golden brown on each side. (Don’t worry about them being cooked through yet). Remove the chops from the pan and set aside. Pour the remaining marinade into a small pot and simmer on low until it reduces by a third.

In the same pan, sauté onions and apples over medium-low heat for 5-6 minutes until the onions are translucent and the apples begin to soften. Put the chops back in the pan with the apples and onions and drizzle the pan with a couple tablespoons of the reduced marinade. Turn the heat to low and cook for an additional 5-10 minutes until the chops are cooked through. To serve, place a pork chop on a dinner plate and spoon apples and onions over it. Drizzle with the pan sauce and serve immediately.

 

Slow Cooked Brisket Over Pappardelle

We spent an idyllic day on my husband’s family’s property over the weekend. It was surprisingly cold and foggy which only magnified the incredible colors of the changing trees. Everywhere you looked deep reds, orange and gold leaves mixed with the dark evergreen trees. Wild turkeys walked past us and the fire we kept going all morning kept us warm and cozy. The kids had a blast running around, putting sticks in the fire and helping Aaron. It’s literally my husband’s favorite place on earth so we all came home with our tanks filled, grateful for such a good weekend together.

When we got home Sunday night I was in the mood for a hearty and cozy meal. My freezer is looking pretty sad and depleted meat-wise as we are a few weeks away from getting our portion of the cow we buy each year. That said, there’s a few cuts that I often feel a little intimidated to use and therefore they sit and sit in the freezer waiting for me to finally do something with them.

I eyed the brisket with a little weariness thinking the only thing I could do is smoke it (which I didn’t have the time or energy to attempt). But I flipped through a couple cookbooks anyway and I found a recipe in Small Victories for brisket. I really had to improvise on the ingredients but I went for it anyway.


This happy accident of a recipe ended up being a home run. I cooked it in the oven for about 5 hours and let it sit in the juices for another couple hours while it cooled down. The sauce ended up being savory and slightly sweet (not bbq sauce…but kind of) and the meat was so tender it fell apart in big chunks in the pot. When we were ready for dinner, I quickly boiled pappardelle in salted water. When the noodles (and you could use any egg noodle or spaghetti squash, which we did when we ate leftovers) were ready, I tossed them in a little butter, fresh parsley and a handful of parmesan cheese. I topped the pasta with a few slices of brisket and we all dug in. Scarlet was the only one to reject dinner but she can’t be trusted these days. One day she eats like the world is ending and the next takes two bites of yogurt and calls it a day. This is definitely a dish I’ll make again and again.


Slow Cooked Brisket Over Pappardelle

  • 1 3-4 pound beef brisket
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 large yellow onion, sliced
  • 4 cloves garlic
  • 2 teaspoons smoked paprika
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 12 dried apricots
  • 6 dried figs
  • 2 cups organic chicken or beef stock
  • 1 15 ounce crushed tomatoes
  • kosher salt and black pepper

In a large dutch oven, heat olive oil over medium heat. Liberally coat both sides of the brisket in salt and pepper (don’t be shy! use lots!). Sear each side of the brisket for 3-4 minutes until both sides of the meat have a golden brown color on it. Remove from the pot and set aside on a plate. Turn the heat to low and start cooking the onion. When the onion has softened, add garlic, spices and tomato paste. Cook for another 4 to 5 minutes. Add the crushed tomatoes, apricots and figs. Stir in the stock and add the brisket back to the pot. Cover the pot with the lid and cook at 325 degrees for about 4 hours. Check the meat halfway through, flipping the meat so the sauce covers the meat.

To serve the brisket, remove the meat from the pot and slice diagonally across the meat. In a separate pot, boil water. Stir in pappardelle and cook to the package instructions (the noodles cook fast, 5ish minutes). Turn off the heat, drain pasta and put back in the pot. Mix one tablespoon butter, two tablespoons fresh chopped parsley and 1/2 cup parmesan cheese into the pasta.

Spoon a few noodles onto each plate. Top with several slices of brisket and a drizzle of the sauce over everything. Enjoy!! If you’re feeling really energetic that day, roast some broccoli in the oven and serve it on the side.

 

Five Minute Peanut Sauce

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In the rush to get out the door to the back-to-school barbecue, Jack and Scarlet were putting their shoes on in the mud room. From around the corner I hear Jack tell his sister, ‘Oh you look really beautiful, do you need help with your shoes? Do you want fancy ones?’

I peeked around the corner to see she had changed into an all white hand-me-down dress from an older friend of ours. It’s lacy and the bottom is tulle and was probably a flower-girl dress at some point. She had accessorized with multiple bracelets and barrettes in her hair and had her bright pink purse ready to go. Jack was holding up sparkly silver jelly shoes (2 sizes too small) for her approval.

And I froze for a second relishing the moment of sibling kindness and affection. Oh man, momming is so rough sometimes right? Not a day goes by when I don’t wonder when the real mom is finally going to show up. You know, the one that actually knows what she’s doing.

I’ve been thinking about that little interaction all week, feeling like maybe I’m messing up just about everything but somehow in the midst of it all, the kids are doing ok. There’s no better feeling I think.

And speaking of messing things up, I am zero for three on dinners last week. I couldn’t get a win to save my life. I made a rolled pork loin that was to ‘herby’ and a chicken and rice dish that was completely rejected by all three kids (who hates chicken and rice? my kids apparently) and roasted veggies with chicken sausages that resulted in one kid gagging at the dinner table and the other two giving up their desserts in order to not have to eat one more bite of the offending dinner.

But this quick and easy peanut sauce was my one win of the week and I’m holding onto it like I am Jack and Scarlet’s sweet little moment in the mudroom. I found the recipe in the Dinner, A Love Story cookbook. I tweaked it a bit and my changes are included in the recipe below. I sautéed kale, Brussel sprouts and a few random veggies in a little sesame oil and then tossed them with zucchini noodles and covered the whole thing in the peanut sauce. For the kids I simply made a few spaghetti noodles and snuck a few zucchini noodles in with them before mixing the sauce over the noodles. They ate this with a side of cucumbers and EVERYONE was happy. Mom win. I’ll take what I can get.

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Five Minute Peanut Sauce

  • 1 small garlic clove
  • 1 (1-inch) piece fresh peeled ginger (really important)
  • ½ cup smooth peanut butter
  • 2/3 cup warm water
  • 1 ½ tablespoons soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon Asian sesame oil
  • 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 1 teaspoon red pepper flakes (we like a little heat, but scale back to taste)
  • pinch of salt and pepper

Pulse garlic and ginger in the bowl of a food processor until finely chopped. Add peanut butter, water, soy sauce, sesame oil, vinegar, sugar, red pepper flakes, salt and pepper and process until smooth. Taste to make sure the flavor is just right.

Mix with cooked and cooled noodles or rice. Use as a dip for grilled chicken and vegetables. Keep in the fridge to throw together an easy meal.

Prosciutto and Nectarine Pizza

Today feels a little bit special. Four years ago this month I published my first column in the Yakima Magazine.  I’ve poured my heart into developing recipes, learning how to take food photos (something I am very much still learning about) and sharing a few words here and there. This little blog is an off-shoot of my column, both of which I cherish very much. The first recipe I ever shared was pizza on the grill so it felt fitting to revisit a house staple and a recipe I’ve tweaked and streamlined over the last couple years. Hope you enjoy!

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The very first article I ever wrote for Yakima Magazine was the September 2014 edition. I knew former editor Robin Beckett through mutual friends and earlier in the summer we ran into each other at a barbecue. She loved the cookies I made for the party (you can find the recipe on yakimamagazine.com, just search chocolate chip cookies) and after chatting for a bit, she asked if I wanted to write something for the magazine. I was floored and excited and spent the rest of the summer planning out exactly what I wanted to feature.

After much deliberation, I decided to write about making pizza on the barbecue. When the day finally came to have photographs done for the article, I had worked myself into a complete frenzy. I had three different pizzas ready to be photographed, my house was clean top to bottom (even though we weren’t taking pictures inside) and I was sweaty, frazzled and very nervous. I vividly remember burning the first pizza, trying hard to laugh off my embarrassment, secretly grateful I had prepped extra pizzas.

Fast forward three years and I’m still here, cooking and baking, making messes and occasionally burning things in my kitchen. I’m so grateful to have Kitchen Captivated in Yakima Magazine to share what I love most, which is making food that brings families and friends to the table together.

It felt right on this ‘anniversary’ of sorts to revisit pizza on the grill. Pizza continues to be a staple around my house because it’s a dinner the whole family loves and gets involved with. But like this column, my pizza-making skills have evolved a bit over the last couple years. My dough recipe is simple and quick, all you need is five minutes to prep and a few hours to let the dough rise. We almost always make pizza on Sunday nights when I have a little extra time in the day. I make the dough in the late morning or early afternoon and leave it on the counter. You could also make dough the night before and store it in the fridge, just pull it out an hour or so before you want to use it.

The beautiful thing about pizza is that just about anything goes when it comes to toppings. This sweet nectarine and prosciutto pizza is a bit of summer goodness in each bite. And while we might be seeing small signs that fall is just around the corner, my local fruit stand is bursting with amazing fresh produce, just begging to be enjoyed. Sweet juicy nectarines (which easily could be swapped for peaches) and salty prosciutto combine with tangy goat cheese, ample fresh basil and a splash of balsamic vinegar for a pizza that is literally bursting with flavor.

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Prosciutto and Nectarine Pizza

  • 1 12-inch pizza dough, rolled out
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 package prosciutto
  • 1 nectarine (or peach), washed and thinly sliced
  • 3 ounces crumbled goat cheese
  • 2 tablespoons fresh basil, chopped
  • ½ cup shredded mozzarella
  • 1-2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
  • Kosher salt

Place prepared dough on a pizza pan sprayed lightly with cooking spray. Brush dough with olive oil. Start with the prosciutto, evenly placing it across the dough, leaving a 1-inch crust around the edges. Top with sliced nectarines then goat cheese and mozzarella. Sprinkle with kosher salt and bake or grill until desired doneness. As soon as the pizza comes off the heat sprinkle generously with chopped basil and balsamic vinegar.

This pizza dough recipe is a hybrid of several outstanding recipes including Mark Bittman’s Pizza Dough, and Yakima’s Essencia Bakery where I had the pleasure of attending a cooking class last year. I simply took the ingredients and techniques from each recipe and adapted them to what works in my kitchen.

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Homemade Pizza Dough

  • 3 cups all-purpose flour, plus more as needed
  • 2 teaspoons rapid rise yeast
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 1 cup tap water, plus more if needed

Using an electric mixer with a dough attachment or a food processor, place the flour, yeast, salt, olive oil and honey into the bowl. Turn the mixer or food processor on and mix a few times. Slowly add the water to the flour mixture until dough forms. If the mixture is very wet, add a tablespoon of flour at a time until the dough is stretchy and moist but not gloppy or overly sticky. If the mixture is too dry and very stiff, add a tablespoon of water at a time until the mixture is just right.

Using well-floured hands, mold the dough into a round ball and place in a clean dry bowl. Cover with plastic wrap and a dish towel and walk away. Let the dough rise for at least 2 hours or until it’s more than doubled in size.

When you are ready to make pizza, divide the dough in half and using well-floured hands and cutting board, work the dough a few times until it’s in a nice ball. Let the dough rest on the board under a towel for an additional 15 minutes. (use this time to shred cheese, pre-heat the oven, dice veggies, ect.) Preheat the oven to 450 degree.

Roll the dough out using a rolling pin to 12 to 14 inches in diameter. Lift the crust onto a pizza pan sprayed with cooking spray. Top with desired toppings and bake for 12-15 minutes.

To grill your pizza on the barbecue (which I highly recommend), simply heat your barbecue to medium high heat. If you have a thermometer, shoot for about 500 degrees. You can place your metal pizza pan directly on the barbecue or if you have a pizza stone, even better. Pizza on the grill usually cooks in about 8-10 minutes. When the crust is golden brown and the cheese is melted, your pizza is ready to come off the heat.

Peanut Butter Granola

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For some reason I was in a funk last week. I’m not quite sure why but if I had to take a guess it probably had something to do with 100 plus degree temps, tired, bored, antsy kids and thick smoke from forest fires to the north of us descending on the Valley leaving us in a foggy soupy mess. Or maybe I was just grumpy. Who knows.

And just when I thought I might legitimately pull my hair out, a friend invited the kids and I to head up into the mountains for a hike along the Tieton River. We even got a patch of blue sky for a bit and the kids splashed and played in the river for hours. We explored a cave and a waterfall and even found a little natural water slide. It was good to get out of our usual routine and just play and have fun together. You would think after eight years of parenting I would recognize that when we get out of sync as a family, nine times out of ten, we just need to get out of the house and go for an adventure. A little change to the routine makes EVERYONE happier.

I went into the weekend feeling settled and eager for more adventures before the summer is over. Way too soon we are going to be back into our busy routines and I don’t want to miss this last month with the kids home.

With the smoke still settled heavily over our town, we spent a lot of time inside this weekend which left me time to putter and play in the kitchen. I’ve been testing out my new instant pot which I was initially a little skeptical of but I think I’m turning into a believer. I made Nom Nom Paleo’s Kalua Pork yesterday and that alone made the purchase worth it. I’ve also made a couple of roast chickens and some bone broth. This week I’m going to make some grains and beans. I’ll keep you posted with how it all goes.

Once I got on a roll in the kitchen, I was kind of a mad woman. I started going through my pantry and decided that I had too many half open bags of coconut, almonds, oats and raisins. I used to make granola all the time and thought the kids would like it on their yogurt. I started whipping up a batch and at the last second decided to stir a little peanut butter into the mixture. The result was a nutty, sweet (but not too sweet) granola with a hint of peanut butter taste. I made the kids parfaits with vanilla yogurt, granola and fresh blueberries and they gobbled them right up.

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Peanut Butter Granola

  • 5 cups rolled oats (NOT instant)
  • 1 cup flaked coconut
  • 1 cup slivered almonds
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • pinch of salt
  • 1/2 cup butter
  • 1/2 cup coconut oil
  • 1/2 cup peanut butter
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a silicone baking mat. In a large bowl mix oat, coconut, almonds, cinnamon and salt together. In a small sauce pan, melt butter, coconut oil, peanut butter and brown sugar together until melted and mixed well. Remove from heat and stir in vanilla. Pour wet mixture over oat mixture and stir well until well combined. Spread evenly on baking sheet and bake for 15-20 minutes, stirring at least once halfway through so the granola gets golden brown on all sides. When the oats are toasty brown and fragrant, remove from oven and allow to cool. Store in an airtight container for up to a month.

To make a yogurt parfait, layer yogurt and granola in a cup and top with blueberries or favorite fruit. Peaches and raspberries are a personal favorite!

Grandma’s Potato Salad

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My grandma was famous for her potato salad. It’s a simple recipe, but something about the way she made it was special. She had a giant vintage white bowl dedicated specifically for this salad and anytime my dad would walk through the back door of her house and see it sitting out on the counter, he would cheer in delight. If he happened to walk through the back door and it wasn’t on the counter, he would rummage through the refrigerator checking for it. If potato salad wasn’t on the menu that night, well I think you can imagine the (good-natured) teasing and pouting that my grandma had to deal with from her grown son and whoever else happened to be invited to dinner.

My grandma made potato salad for family and friends well into her eighties, always a double or triple batch served from her special bowl. My parents have the big white bowl at their house now and my mom makes the recipe a few times each summer. In the last couple years, I’ve tried my hand at making the salad.

This recipe is completely from memory and taste; as so many of the most special recipes usually are. I don’t think my grandma ever wrote her recipes down. She was an intuitive home cook, with zero training but an arsenal of recipes her family and friends loved and requested time and time again.

My dad always has a few pointers based on what he remembers and whenever I make the salad for him, I try and do it exactly the way my grandma made it. But when I make a batch to take to a barbecue or just for my little family, I tweak it slightly by adding more fresh herbs to make it my own. The only real secret to this very simple recipe is patience and high-quality ingredients. Let your potatoes and hard-boiled eggs cool completely. Don’t rush this step or the texture won’t be the same. Also, use the best quality mayonnaise you can.

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Grandma’s Potato Salad

  • 3 pounds baby red and yellow potatoes, washed and quartered
  • 5 hard-boiled eggs
  • 2 cups diced celery
  • 1/2 cup mayonnaise
  • 2 tablespoons green onions, thinly sliced
  • 2 tablespoons fresh parsley, finely chopped
  • 2-3 tablespoons, finely chopped dill
  • 1 ½ teaspoons kosher salt
  • ½ teaspoon black pepper

In a large pot, boil washed and cut potatoes for about 10 to 15 minutes until they are fork tender but still firm. Drain completely and set aside to cool. Hard-boil eggs. I put room temperature eggs into a pot of cold water and cover with a lid. Using my gas stove, I turn the heat to high and boil the eggs for exactly 11 minutes (set a timer). When the timer goes off, remove from heat and drain the water from the eggs. Set the hard-boiled eggs aside to cool. When the potatoes and eggs have cooled completely, you are ready to assemble your salad.

Start by chopping the celery, herbs and eggs. My grandma always diced the eggs and celery in smaller pieces than the potatoes. In a large bowl, mix together potatoes, eggs, celery, green onions and herbs setting aside a teaspoon of chopped dill. Using a spatula, gently mix the mayonnaise with the vegetables. Salt and pepper liberally and taste to make sure the ratios are how you like it. Add a little more mayonnaise or salt and pepper if needed. Garnish with the last teaspoon of dill. Cover and refrigerate if you aren’t going to serve immediately.

Strawberry Rhubarb Crisp Bars

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I’ve had some sort of garden since I’ve moved to Yakima (11 years now…woah!). It started with a ‘salsa’ planter, essentially a pot with a tomato, cilantro and jalapeno plants, my mother-in-law gave me the first spring we owned our first house (2006…I think). I was 23, knew absolutely nothing about plants or gardening and dutifully watered that pot every time I remembered (which wasn’t often).

My mother is an incredible gardener. She can and does grow everything. Her yard has every type of flower you can imagine and for a few years she tended a huge almost 1-acre vegetable garden growing so much produce she would drop off laundry baskets full of produce at the homeless shelter almost every week.

And then there’s me. Sometimes the apple falls a little farther away from the tree. I’ve had some good years. I remember picking raspberries into October at my old house (although I’m not sure I can take any credit for that, I didn’t actually plant those raspberries). Some years go better than others. I love plants and flowers and I do love to garden but I would say my gardening has more fails than successes most years. Weeds and bugs and moles seem to win out.

This year I really threw some effort into it though. I asked (pleaded and begged) Aaron to build me some garden boxes. I researched companion planting and mapped out what would go into each box. I was envisioning a Better Homes and Gardens Magazine garden spread with overflowing boxes and sweet little paths in between.

The reality is Aaron cut his hand and needed 9 stitches while building the boxes. And even though we filled the boxes with very-high quality soil, our plants are unhappy and turning yellow, lacking the necessary nutrients to grow. Oh and did I mention the weeds? So many weeds.

But I’m not giving up just yet. I’m out there weeding like crazy and we fertilized and changed our watering schedule. If nothing else, I should have stronger arms by the end of the summer from the weeding alone. I keep telling myself it’s good to work a problem.

My friend gifted me literally an armful of rhubarb last week. Her garden is mature and lovely and everything grows like crazy. I was only a tiny bit jealous when she showed me. But anyway, I had to do something with all that rhubarb. I decided on strawberry rhubarb crisp bars from Smitten Kitchen. This recipe was a bit like my garden…it’s good to work a problem. Be smarter than me and really follow the directions. I had to make these twice because I didn’t read the directions carefully enough and the bars ended up soggy and mushy. Sprinkle the cornstarch over the prepared fruit and make sure to store the bars in the fridge. This is an easy recipe, and the bars are sweet and tangy and absolutely delicious, with a buttery oat filled crust.

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Strawberry Rhubarb Crisp Bars

1 cup (80 grams) rolled oats
3/4 cup (95 grams) plus up to 2 tablespoons (15 grams) extra all-purpose flour
1/2 cup (95 grams) light brown sugar
Heaped 1/4 teaspoon table salt
6 tablespoons (85 grams) unsalted butter, melted
1 teaspoon cornstarch (optional, but helps firm up the filling)
1 tablespoon (15 ml) lemon juice
1 tablespoon (15 grams) granulated sugar, divided
1 cup (125 grams) small-diced rhubarb (from about 1 1/2 medium stalks)
1 cup (155 grams) small-diced strawberries
Powdered sugar, for decoration, if desired

Heat oven to 375 degrees F. For easy removal, line bottom and two sides of 8-by-8-inch square baking pan with parchment paper. No need to bother (and no greasing needed) if you plan to serve them right in the pan, as I did.

Place oats, 3/4 cup flour, brown sugar and salt in bottom of baking pan and mix. Pour melted butter over, and stir until clumps form. If the clumps feel soft or look overly damp, add the remaining 2 tablespoons flour. Set aside 1/2 cup of the crumble mixture. Press the rest of the crumb mixture evenly in the bottom of the pan.

Spread half the fruit over the crust. Sprinkle it evenly with cornstarch, then lemon juice, and 1/2 tablespoon of granulated sugar. Spread remaining fruit over this, and top with second 1/2 tablespoon sugar. Scatter reserved crumbs over fruit and bake bars for 30 to 40 minutes (firmer fruits will take longer), until fruit is bubbly and crisp portion is golden and smells toasty and amazing.

Let cool in pan; I do this in the fridge, where they become crisp once chilled (less so at room temperature). Cut into squares and sprinkle with powdered sugar before serving. Store leftovers in fridge.